609. Zaatar Croissants

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Zaatar croissant in the Middle East is equivalent to a butter croissant in Europe.Based in my kiri croissant recipe, I did a couple of modifications to make this version  more wholesome and rustic at the same time.
Instead of using only regular white flour, I did part oat flour, part whole wheat flour, and part regular flour.
I also did not twist the ends into a crescent shape, and left then into tapered rods; I’m not sure why I did that, but I liked the result.
The dough is meant to be extra soft, fight the urge to add more flour!

Ingredients:

1 cup oats
1 cup flour
1 cup whole wheat flour
2 Tbsp powdered milk
2 eggs
2 tsp yeast
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
2 Tbsp ghee (or soft butter)
1/4 cup oil
1 cup warm water
4 Tbsp zaatar

For the topping:
1 egg, beaten

Method:

Either using a food processor, pulse the oats until ground into a flour.
Add all the rest of the ingredients except for the zaatar until a soft dough is formed.
Cover in a bowl and let rest for an hour.
Divide the dough into four balls.
Store three balls covered while working with the fourth.
Roll the dough into a large circle.

Quarter the circle, then cut each quartered into three equal parts.
Sprinkle a heaping tablespoon of zaatar over the circle.
Roll up the triangle, starting at the wide side and place on non-stick baking sheet.
Brush the tops with egg wash and let rest for another 10 to 15 minutes.
Bake in a preheated 360F oven for 20 minutes, plus a minute or two on broil to give a golden color.
Let cool slightly before consuming warm or cold.

 

 

 صحة و عافية
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8 thoughts on “609. Zaatar Croissants”

  1. Oh no you mustn't or it will be tough!
    You can oil your hands and lightly flour the tabletop where you roll the dough.
    The dough 2ill do its best to stick to the table but keep lightly dusting with flour under it as you roll.
    Resting the dough a bit also eases the stickiness.
    Let me know how it works out!!

  2. Oh no you mustn't or it will be tough!
    You can oil your hands and lightly flour the tabletop where you roll the dough.
    The dough 2ill do its best to stick to the table but keep lightly dusting with flour under it as you roll.
    Resting the dough a bit also eases the stickiness.
    Let me know how it works out!!

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